Cross-Kingdom Chemical Communication Drives a Heritable, Mutually Beneficial Prion-Based Transformation of Metabolism

Citation:

Jarosz, D.  F. ; Brown, J.  C. S. ; Walker, G.  A. ; Datta, M.  S. ; Ung, W.  L. ; Lancaster, A.  K. ; Rotem, A. ; Chang, A. ; Newby, G.  A. ; Weitz, D.  A. ; et al. Cross-Kingdom Chemical Communication Drives a Heritable, Mutually Beneficial Prion-Based Transformation of Metabolism. Cell 2014, 158, 1083 - 1093. Copy at http://www.tinyurl.com/lu6dzbc
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Abstract:

Summary In experimental science, organisms are usually studied in isolation, but in the wild, they compete and cooperate in complex communities. We report a system for cross-kingdom communication by which bacteria heritably transform yeast metabolism. An ancient biological circuit blocks yeast from using other carbon sources in the presence of glucose. [GAR+], a protein-based epigenetic element, allows yeast to circumvent this “glucose repression” and use multiple carbon sources in the presence of glucose. Some bacteria secrete a chemical factor that induces [GAR+]. [GAR+] is advantageous to bacteria because yeast cells make less ethanol and is advantageous to yeast because their growth and long-term viability is improved in complex carbon sources. This cross-kingdom communication is broadly conserved, providing a compelling argument for its adaptive value. By heritably transforming growth and survival strategies in response to the selective pressures of life in a biological community, [GAR+] presents a unique example of Lamarckian inheritance.

Publisher's Version

Last updated on 10/19/2014